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Fitness App Lights Up Military Bases

Security fears have been raised after the Strava fitness app was revealed to ‘light-up’ the running routes used by users on military bases.

Strava has published a heat map that reveals where its users have logged where they are running or cycling.

Now, the data appears to reveal the structure of military bases in many countries including Afghanistan and Syria with soldiers using the app when moving around them.

US military chiefs say they are now examining the heat map for potential security issues.

The app utilises the mobile phone’s GPS to track the user’s exercise activity so they can check on their performance levels and also compare them with others.

There are around 27 million Strava users around the world.

Ransomware attacks rise by 93%

A security report has revealed that incidents of ransomware attacks have rocketed by 93%.

The findings from Malwarebytes, an antivirus offering, says that these attacks will continue to increase.

The firm looked at the activities of hackers last year in their attempts to steal or lock personal data.

The report reveals that hackers are becoming more persistent and are targeting PCs and Macs as well as Android smartphones.

There has been a big rise in ransomware  attacks where the hacker uses a virus to lock a computer or its files and then demands an extortion fee so access can be recovered by the victim.

One incident major incident last year occurred when NHS computers, as part of a worldwide ransomware attack, fell victim to the WannaCry virus.

Of the threats, Malwarebytes reports that adware is responsible for 40% of all the threats detected, an increase of 132% on 2016’s figures.

Young children increasingly own smartphones

A report reveals that around one in five children aged 5 to 6 now owns a mobile phone.

By the time they are seven or eight, this figure jumps to 41% and rises again to 59% for those aged nine and 10, says the Childwise Monitor.

By the time they are 11, 90% of children have a mobile phone.

On average, children are spending around three hours every day using their phone for various activities including messaging, going online and playing games.

Child safety raised over popular app

Parents have been warned to monitor their children’s app activity if they are using the popular smartphone game Roblox which is aimed at young children and dubbed the new Minecraft.

The app is a popular multiplayer game that enables users to design their own games and play different ones and has attracted more than 30 million players aged between eight and 12.

However, there are fears that children are receiving inappropriate messages from strangers online.

Children also report that they have seen naked characters in the game, some doing ‘adult things’, and now parents are being urged by Internet safety groups to check their children’s inbox for messages from strangers.

Questions raised over phone use at petrol stations

With so many warning signs in petrol stations for users not to use their smartphone, questions have been raised over actual safety levels with the unveiling of new apps that enable drivers to pay for their fuel without leaving their car.

The BPme app from BP has been launched this week to following in the steps of Shell’s Fill Up & Go so drivers can pay for fuel without queueing up in the station.

The apps work when the motorist pulls up alongside a pump, logs into their app, confirms the pump number as well as their payment method and the petrol station’s location service will then pinpoint where they are.

The question was raised by The Sun newspaper and the UK Petroleum Industry Association says drivers don’t have to worry about using phones when at a filling station.

They say that phone use should, however, be restricted when refuelling.

The BP app does make clear that users should only use it from inside their car.

In other mobile phone app news …

Apple has revealed that it is bringing iOS apps to Macs this year which have the ability of natively running. This is part of the firm’s project called Marzipan which simplifies the developer tools to enable the porting of apps from iOS to macOS.