Phone Apps Face Cull on Apple’s App Store

From September 7, Apple will begin reviewing apps on the App Store and removing those that do not meet its exacting standards.

The firm says that apps that are up-to-date and of good quality will be safe but those apps that crash when launched will be immediately removed from the store.

Other apps that do not meet their guidelines will see developers getting 30 days to make changes to improve them.

Apple also says it’s also going to crackdown on the naming of apps including those that use words purely to push the app up search lists. Long app names are also going to be curtailed – a new limit of 50 characters is going to be introduced.

Many of those being removed initially will be apps that have not been updated for a long period of time and which no longer function as they were intended to do.

With more than 2 million apps in the firm’s App Store a clear-out may well be overdue though Apple watchers are waiting to see how many are actually removed.

Australian banks criticise Apple Pay

Four banks in Australia are accusing Apple of operating a cartel over its mobile payment platform, Apple Pay.

The banks want access to the firm’s contactless technology so they can develop third-party applications for its customers without them having to use Apple Pay.

With more than 3,000 financial institutions now using Apple Pay, it’s unlikely the banks will succeed with their aim but they’ve put a complaint into the country’s Competition and Consumer Commission and is urging the watchdog to act.

Students are addicted to their smart phones

Researchers have revealed that students are addicted to their smart phones with some owning more than one and apps play a big part in their lifestyles.

The findings from Mobile World Live reveal that 83% of respondents check their phone within five minutes of waking up every morning.

The most popular apps for students are WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram which account for 65% of the market and all are owned by Facebook.

Students also make great use of mobile banking apps and despite the dominance of Amazon, many prefer real-world bookstores to buy books for their studies.

However, it appears that using smartphones for making voice calls is now falling in popularity with many students opting to use messaging services instead.

Meanwhile, in a UK survey of children’s use of smart phones, it appears that games are the most popular uses for them, for 63% of mobile phone owners, while apps come a close second for 58% of children.

The study by Halifax revealed that 73% of youngsters aged between eight and 15 now own a mobile phone and nearly all of them own a tablet too.

It also appears that other digital devices are falling out of favour with one in three owning an iPod and just 22% owning an MP3 player.

In other mobile phone app news…

Coming soon – booking Uber by phone rather than by app. Uber and Lyft in the US have realised that there’s a massive market of elderly customers who would use their services but who don’t own smartphones, hence the introduction of phoning an operator to book a car.

A survey has revealed that half of the UK’s mobile phone users do not know their data allowances. The findings from giffgaff reveal that 52% are unaware of the limits with many regularly going over their allowance with users mainly accessing the web, social media and messaging functions.

Search and Mobile enthusiast, like to tinker in apps, machine learning, big data and currently Python.