Google Apps Collude to Mine Data

A study has revealed that thousands of apps on Google’s Android system are colluding to share their user’s data without any consent.

In addition, this is leaving the phones vulnerable to hacking.

The researchers at Virginia Tech in the US found that trusted apps were able to communicate with each other and exchange information which creates various implications for phone users.

A spokesman for the research team said: “It’s the first-time real-world evidence has been found that apps are colluding with each other.

“Apps are getting information from each other when they do not have the permissions for doing so.”

One problem is hackers could use a malicious third party app which, when downloaded, will collude with an authentic application which thinks is genuine and enable hackers to access personal data.

These apps are, apparently, accessing data from Google Play, Gmail, Google Photos and Google Docs, among others.

Businesses urged to take mobile security responsibility

A report reveals that businesses should step in to provide mobile security when users are reckless with their devices when downloading apps.

The RiskIQ report highlights that smartphone users often stray from the official app stores when downloading applications which then puts them at greater risk from malware and ransomware.

While the report highlights that the UK’s smartphone users are more conservative than their US counterparts, they are still taking risks.

One of the issues is that mobile users are ‘jailbreaking’ their devices, around 14% of users do so, so they can download apps they would not be able to use otherwise.

The report states: “While jailbreaking allows more choice, it bypasses the security mechanisms put in place by official app stores and carriers.”

The report concludes that businesses should be more proactive in fighting mobile threats since ‘careless users’ lack the relevant mobile security acumen.

Phone distraction causes car crashes

A study in America has revealed that drivers who are distracted by their phone’s apps cause 52% of smashes.

In addition, 25% of drivers will use their phone with a minute of having a crash.

The findings come from Cambridge Mobile Telematics and a spokesman said: “This is a big problem for drivers and pedestrians and it’s a dominant factor in whether you will have a crash.”

In other Miratrix mobile phone app news …

Smartphone users in India are being warned that the mobile apps for seven banks have been infected with malware. The warning comes as users are urged to install a personal security certificate which has been sent by hackers.

To help launch their new album, The Charlatans have turned their popular singles into phone apps. Fans have to guess the song from the icons on their screen.

A researcher says more funding should be provided to help people access digital health services in the UK. Lecturer Siobhan O’Connor said more research is needed to understand the barriers users face which include lack of mobile phone signals and not understanding how health apps can help.

Social media users in the US may be due a pay-out after a judge in San Francisco ruled that the user’s privacy may have been compromised. The ruling will cost eight firms including Kik, Foursquare, Twitter and Yelp more than $5million. The action focused on those who used their smartphone to access the platforms between 2009 and 2012.

A mobile phone app may help users access cheaper electricity from 2020 after an EU ruling. The idea is to use apps to encourage people to use electricity when it is cheap and abundant – usually on sunny days when renewable energy such as solar panels are effective. The move would see flexible prices being introduced to match energy production.

Search and Mobile enthusiast, like to tinker in apps, machine learning, big data and currently Python.