Drivers Warned Over Drive-thru Apps

Legal experts are warning that drivers in the UK who pay for fast food at a drive-through restaurant on their mobile phone may be breaking the law.

The warning comes after the penalties for driving and using a mobile phone were doubled for those caught on British roads.

However, lawyers at one Scottish legal firm say that using a phone app to pay via contactless methods could land the driver with a £200 fine and six penalty points.

The law firm says that to use a smartphone app in anyway while the vehicle’s engine is running is illegal.

And the rules which are applied to drivers using mobiles when behind the wheel also apply to those who using their mobile devices to pay via contactless methods.

Phone users are also being warned about sneaking a peek at their social media sites including Twitter and Facebook while they are awaiting their order to be delivered.

Some regional newspapers are also reporting that Cleveland Police have been advising people to switch off engines before paying at a drive-through with their smart phone – though they point out that ‘common sense’ will be applied before anyone is prosecuted.

Phone users cause car smashes

Researchers in America have concluded that more than half of car smashes are caused by drivers using a smartphone app.

The study was carried out by Cambridge Mobile Telematics by analysing 1,000 real-world car crashes along with tens of thousands of near misses.

Among the most common forms for distraction are texting, social media and email use.

The study reveals that drivers are distracted for at least 135 seconds when they use their phone.

The research concludes that drivers who use their phone most when driving are around six times more likely to be involved in a crash in those who are not as distracted.

In other Miratrix mobile phone news …

Google has revealed that it’s Android Pay app is no longer needed for those making mobile payments after the search giant integrated the app’s functionality into a wide range of mobile banking apps.

After hitting the headlines, the mobile app for United Airlines is being deluged with one star reviews from outraged users after a man was forcibly dragged from an over-booked flight.

Beach walkers are being urged by the RNLI to use apps for checking the weather and tide times after 55 people were stranded on a beach near Robin Hood’s Bay in North Yorkshire.

Researchers at Newcastle University have revealed that hackers can steal passwords and PIN numbers just from analysing how a mobile phone will tilt when being held. The researchers managed to crack a four-digit pin with 70% accuracy and had cracked it completely by the fifth attempt. Apparently, phone makers know of the problem but have not devised a solution.

Facebook has announced that its Messenger app has now reached 1.2 billion users. The firm now has three apps with more than 1 billion users each, including WhatsApp.

A study by researchers at New York University has revealed that the fingerprint sensors being used by many smartphones are not as reliable or as safe as users may believe. They managed to use artificial fingerprints that could match the user’s real prints to unlock the phone in 65% of attempts.

More bad news for users of Windows phones after an announcement that Spotify, one of the world’s most popular streaming services, is to stop maintaining its app for the platform.

Oxfam has been trialling contactless donation boxes with donors able to use their mobile phone contactless payment apps for making a donation, along with debit and credit cards.

Search and Mobile enthusiast, like to tinker in apps, machine learning, big data and currently Python.